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The impossible job

tom_ecfc

Active member
Joined
Jul 24, 2022
Messages
4,531
Location
Near a cat flap
I think sometimes you have to look at higher up the pyramid than just the refs on some decisions. Things like time wasting with just the ref giving an arm movement to hurry up is frustrating and doesn’t achieve anything. This is just one example of many.

When the ref has to follow these ‘silly’ rules along with making the odd mistake, it makes them look much poorer than they actually are. Some are just rubbish must I add!
 

Rosencrantz

Very well known Exeweb poster
Joined
Jul 12, 2019
Messages
10,435
Location
Tiverton
All I generally ask for is consistency across a game. I don't actually mind a ref having a bad game if he is bad for both teams. The rules are mainly subjective and it is no surprise that different refs handle games differently. Back in the depths of time you always knew you would have a different interpretation and management of a game when Roger Milford was in charge than Paul Durkin.

The problem is that the increased coverage and analysis has highlighted the differences and now consistency is looked for across all games. Add in VAR, which I don't think is necessarily bad, but is struggling to be adapted to in the PL, and we have what we have.

VAR could be improved considerably by better and clearer communication and speeding up the process. Watching most European games, they seem to be far quicker to come to a decision to get the ref to the monitor or play on. They also seem to have a better offside system which is much quicker to use.

It would also help to hear the conversation at the screen between ref and VAR official like in Rugby. At least you then know the process that leads to the decision, even if you might not necessarily agree like with the red card for Freddie Steward at the weekend in Ireland. You can at least know the rationale behind the decision.
 
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
709
All I generally ask for is consistency across a game. I don't actually mind a ref having a bad game if he is bad for both teams. The rules are mainly subjective and it is no surprise that different refs handle games differently. Back in the depths of time you always knew you would have a different interpretation and management of a game when Roger Milford was in charge than Paul Durkin.

The problem is that the increased coverage and analysis has highlighted the differences and now consistency is looked for across all games. Add in VAR, which I don't think is necessarily bad, but is struggling to be adapted to in the PL, and we have what we have.

VAR could be improved considerably by better and clearer communication and speeding up the process. Watching most European games, they seem to be far quicker to come to a decision to get the ref to the monitor or play on. They also seem to have a better offside system which is much quicker to use.

It would also help to hear the conversation at the screen between ref and VAR official like in Rugby. At least you then know the process that leads to the decision, even if you might not necessarily agree like with the red card for Freddie Steward at the weekend in Ireland. You can at least know the rationale behind the decision.
VAR is the main reason that I rarely watch live Premier League games now, despite having access via my broadband package.

I think VAR has increased, rather than decreased, the cynicism at the top level of the sport. Contact, however slight, always looks worse in slow mo and there's always one camera angle you can find to see a 'foul'. This means players go down more often and with less reason, just on the chance of getting a decision - the very opposite of what the system was designed to do.

League 1 football isn't perfect (time wasting is a particular problem). But for me it's a lot more enjoyable to watch than the PL. At least when a goal is scored you still know it's a goal and no-one sat in an office 200 miles away can rob you of that moment of pure joy.
 
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